comments 2

Bison Siberia Bound

Canada is sending 30 wood bison from Alberta to Siberia. This begs the question, how do you put 30 bison safely on an airplane? They’re big critters, and independent too. My other question is, what do we get in Perhaps a few hockey players to help the hapless Leafs?

2 Comments

  1. In Yellowstone Park, the bison is the most dangerous animal. This is because they mostly just stand around looking harmless. They don’t see too well, and they don’t have any appointments to keep. However, they are capable of remarkable power and speed for short bursts. Tourists stop their cars and get out and set up their cameras in front of these harmless looking beasts. Every now and then one wakes up and tramples a tourist.

  2. Salvelinas Fontinalis

    ok I read the article and I will call it simply shoddy journalism. There are questions left unanswered which could likely have been answered by a couple of phone calls and would have made for a more complete article.

    First there is the issue of compensation. My feeling is that since no money was mentioned that we are tossing out a freebie here of 30 of our endangered species. The 30 that were shipped over 5 years ago were called a transfer and that sounds like a freebie too. The article should have answered that question.

    Then there is the question of what became of the 30 we sent 5 years ago. If they lived and prospered that 30 might well be 150 now and someone should be asking why we are sending more.

    The article states that wood buffalo have been shipped “all over Canada” . nice. where? We have woods where I live and I havent seen any. Why not?

    Did we also ship any treehuggers over to watch over these buffalo? Surely it wouldnt be hard to get a couple of treehuggers to volunteer to spend say 10 years in Siberia. Actually I think Siberia would be a great spot to send a lot of treehuggers, Maybe set up a quota system for each province to offer up a half dozen of them each year. Perhaps the person who wrote the article would like to go over and send us monthly updates on their progress. I hear Siberia is beautiful in the winter.

    Having said that, it is nice to see an endangered species that doesnt eat people make a recovery.

Leave a Reply to Salvelinas Fontinalis Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s