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Episode 1: The 27th Street Podcast

Here is Episode 1 of the 27th Street Podcast. It features an interview with Sheila Gregory in which we talk about Garden Walk Buffalo as well as Sheila’s web photo project called The Left Overs. The second segment is called Storytime which features a story my father told me many times, called Red Striped Socks.

The opening intro is me playing solo banjo. The piece is an old fiddle tune called Julianna Johnson. For those banjo freaks in the audience, I’m playing a Bart Reiter Standard banjo in CC tuning. There is a short banjo interlude in the podcast. This is again me playing banjo, this time a Nechville Atlas. This is an excerpt from a fiddle tune called Spotted Pony. The end theme is Bonaparte’s March, played in Sawmill tuning. I learned this tune from Cathy Barton Para at the 2014 Midwest Banjo Camp. This version is similar to the Indian Creek Delta Boys’ version, which they learned from Harvey “Pappy” Taylor. At some point in the future, I hope to bring other musicians into the podcast.

I ended up recording this podcast in Garage Band. I used a Yeti USB mic with a pop filter. I’ve submitted it to iTunes. I understand it can take a few days for it to show up over there. Meanwhile, you can hear it here at 27th Street.

If you need the RSS feed, it is: http://27thstreet.libsyn.com/rss

I’m not sure yet how frequent these podcasts will be. In the coming weeks I’ll establish a frequency and try to stick to it.

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George is 2 tomorrow

George is celebrating his second birthday on 27th Street tomorrow.  Wang dang doodle!

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Exotic butterfly…

When the storm came yesterday evening, Tuffy P moved her mosaics operation from the deck to mosaics central. She finished it off while I put my feet up and watched the first ever episode of Colombo.

IMG_4104If you haven’t seen any of our mosaics before, check out Long Branch Mosaics.

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Afternoon, out back

DSC09358This afternoon we planted the two pillars we bought at Nice Old Stuff. We’ve made them kind of like an entranceway to the forested part of the yard. These will be adorned with mosaic-work along the way.

DSC09346Of course I had to take several breaks to play ball with George.

IMG_4101Meanwhile, having finished off one butterfly mosaic yesterday, Tuffy P was hard at work on another one – this one an exotic blue butterfly.

DSC09339Memphis, recovering very well from her surgery, hung out on the deck and watched all the activity.

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Butterfly mosaic

Tuffy P finished the first of a pair of butterfly mosaics. The first has a familiar pattern…

DSC00857Here is is in context on our fence, along with a painting Tuffy did for the garden a number of years ago. DSC00859Tuffy P says the next one is going to be irridescent blues.

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Buffalo Garden Walk July 25 and 26th 2015

Working with what you've got!

Buffalo Garden Walk 2015 – over 400 Gardens open to the public for free.  We enjoyed gardens of all shapes and sizes. This one is so new. Remember your first few plants in your garden? It starts with one plant – and transforms from there.

more soon….

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Way Down the Old Plank Road

Here is some old time music for a Sunday morning. Do you know Way Down the Old Plank Road? Uncle Dave Macon’s 1926 recording stayed in our collective folky consciousness thanks to the eccentric experiemental filmmaker Harry Smith, who put together a 6 album collection of American folk music in 1952. Released by Folkways Records, it was called The Anthology of American Folk Music, although today many people just call it the Harry Smith Anthology. This anthology was tremendously influential and became source material for aspiring folkies everywhere.

Way Down the Old Plank Road appeared on Volume 3 Songs (Blue Singing). Uncle Dave did a great job on this tune. I don’t know if he was responsible for writing this one or if it was an old tune even in his day.

The Whiskey Bent Valley Boys describe their music as “hard driving traditional tunes that’ll tickle your innards”. They are featured on numerous videos on the YouTube machine, and I really like their treatment of this tune and numerous others. I hope you like this one as much as I do.